Posts Tagged ‘recipe’

Ginger Chick’n & Fig Stir-Fry

It’s been quite awhile since I posted any recipes to this blog. That’s in part because I’ve tried to make it more about writing, and maybe because I haven’t tried out many new meals — until tonight! And I apologize for not taking a picture, but I wasn’t 100% sure it would turn out good enough to blog about, but it did. And it looked as good as it tasted.

Here’s what led to the recipe: This summer we’re having a bumper crop of figs. We’ve already had our favorite Fresh Fig and Gorgonzola Pasta three times, and we’ve frozen figs to make it again later. So this morning, after picking another batch of fresh figs from the trees in our yard and putting some of them in the freezer, I wondered what to do with the rest. There were more than I wanted to just eat raw (though I did have some), and more will be ripening soon, so I figured I should cook with them and decided to give a stir-fry a try. It was delicious! (Try it if you have figs and don’t believe me — I dare you.)

You already know the main ingredients from the title, and really, I expect you couldn’t go too wrong no matter what else you throw in, but let me explain what I did.

Since we’re vegetarians, the protein base of this meal is called Quorn. They make two varieties: a ground beef substitute and a chicken substitute. To be honest, it’s been so long since I’ve eaten actual chicken, I don’t know whether it’s much like the real thing or not, but that doesn’t really matter. Quorn has a firmer texture than tofu, which makes it a good candidate for this dish. Tempeh or seitan might work well, too, and tofu would be all right but a little soft in texture, even if you get extra-firm. Ginger adds a little bite, and the figs add sweetness. The combination was great, especially with the other vegetables I threw in.

I always start a stir-fry with some onion and garlic in oil. In this case, I added a generous amount of diced ginger, at least a tablespoon, probably more for 1-2 servings. Then I added one small Thai eggplant (the long skinny kind), one small yellow squash, a small sweet pepper, and a couple of mushrooms. I let those fry in a wok for several minutes while my pasta water boiled.

Tonight, I used linguine because that’s what I had on hand, but it would be good with a sturdy rice noodle or bean thread or even asian egg noodle— anything as think as linguine or thicker ought to do well. Boil or soak until soft (follow the cooking directions).

To the stir-fry, I added curry powder, cayenne, and cumin as it was cooking, then added the Quorn Chick’n pieces. Since they’re pre-cooked, all they really need is some time to heat up (you store them in the freezer) and absorb the cooking juices. I also added soy sauce and a little bit of sugar to the mix.

Near the end of the stir-frying, I added one small tomato, chopped, and several quartered fresh figs (about as much volume as the tomato). Then I tossed in a few fresh basil leaves that I had cut into large pieces and a little Sriracha for good measure. Once the noodles were ready, I drained them and then tossed in the wok with the stir-fry to absorb the liquid.

The first bite was to die for — a little sweet, savory, and picante. The heat wasn’t too much (for me), so the basil stood out, especially when I got a bite with a good piece. The tomato and fig didn’t cook too much, so they didn’t lose their shape, and the Quorn gave it just the right texture.

As always with my recipes, it’s more about the principle than the exact ingredients. If you have other veggies on hand or if you prefer to cook with tempeh (its nutty flavor ought to pair well in this dish), then go for it! If you have more fresh figs than you know what to do with, then give this concept a try. It’s hard to go wrong with figs as long as you don’t overcook them. Next time I might try throwing in a little lemon or lime or even orange juice, just to give it a little citrus tang. Or a little cooking sherry to bring out the sweet side even more.

 

 

Ginger Cranberry Stir-Fry with Peanut Sauce

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, I decided to come up with another red dinner. We had a few fresh cranberries kicking around the other day, and I decided they were too few to cook up the normal way and too many to put in a muffin or salad, so I would try adding them to a stir-fry. The ‘recipe’ could be made with just about any combination of vegetables you have on hand, but this is what I did.

Stir-fry onion, garlic, and plenty of fresh ginger. Some people grate theirs, but I usually just coarsely dice it. I would say I added at least a tablespoon. Add to that diced parsnip and carrots, then mushrooms, and finally bok choy. I usually slice the white end of the bok choy into thin half-moons and then chop up the green leafy end pretty fine. Spice with curry and about a tablespoon of pure maple syrup (you could use brown sugar or regular sugar, but we had the dregs of a maple syrup bottle on hand that I wanted to use up).

Then, I added a cup or two of Quorn ‘chicken tenders’ for protein. You could use tofu or any other oriental vegetarian protein (or I suppose if you eat meat, chicken would do well).

Quorn is a product we discovered a few years back in Europe, but can now get in our local Kroger. It is made from a fungus, like  a mushroom, and is high in protein. It cooks a little like chicken when sold in nuggets, or like ground beef when sold in little pieces. Its flavor and texture is better than the old style TVP, so we use it as a tofu substitute — a) for a change of pace, and b) because it isn’t made from soy.

Near the end of the stir-frying, I added soy sauce and the cranberries, about a cup of fresh berries. I let them cook a bit until they started to pop open. Then I added a couple of spoonfuls of peanut butter to the liquid in the wok to make a peanut sauce. To kick up the spice, I added some Sambal Olek (garlic and red chili paste), though Sriracha would do well, too.

Serve over rice (though it would be fine with oriental noodles as well). The cranberry and maple syrup gave this a sweet/sour taste, kicked up a notch with the ginger and chili, and the peanut sauce made it creamy and rich. I might not serve this every night, but now and then, esp. when you have a few stray cranberries kicking around (or want a red meal for a special occasion), it makes a great change of pace.

Creamed Asparagus on Toast

It’s been awhile since I posted a recipe, and tonight’s comfort food is perfect for this time of year (or any time, but it makes me think of spring). So next time asparagus is on sale or you find some at the farmer’s market (or better yet, pick it fresh from the garden), give this a try. It’s easy, filling, and delicious.

The basic recipe includes asparagus cut into 1-2 inch lengths, onion, butter/olive oil, milk, hard boiled eggs (make ahead and peel when cool), and toast. For 3 people, we use about a pound of asparagus and half an onion. Sauté a the onion in oil and/or butter (a generous amount such as a tablespoon of each). When the onions start to turn clear but not browned, toss in the asparagus and lightly sauté for a couple of minutes. Then add two or three tablespoons of flour (a couple of handfuls) and stir until the flour is coated in oil. Add milk a little at a time to make a fairly thick cream sauce. Cut the eggs into halves or quarters and then into pieces (use one egg per person, give or take). Salt and pepper to taste.

Toast the bread — we prefer home made whole wheat bread that is a little dry already (the end of an old loaf), but store bought bread is okay. Whole grain is best, but it’s really up to you. When I was a kid and my Mom made this for us, I’m pretty sure she buttered the toast, but we generally skip that step. Ladle some of the creamed asparagus over a piece of toast and serve. 

To spice it up, add some mushrooms or other spices (I added a little fresh fennel tonight for fun). To stretch if you don’t have a lot of asparagus, you could add carrot or parsnip cut into match stick pieces. A little green pepper might also work or in place of regular onion, use shallot or green onion. If you want a creamier sauce, use whole milk. For a lighter version, use 2% or less, or use low fat buttermilk to replace all or part of the milk.

Okra Fusion

If you live in the South and have a garden, know someone who has a garden, or visit your local farmer’s market regularly (as we do), then chances are you are awash in okra this time of year. We love this slimy little vegetable, but even so, the steady supply can sometimes be a bit overwhelming and challenging to find new ways to cook it.

Of course, we know and enjoy the traditional way to fry okra, though usually we opt for something a little less greasy. When we have fried it recently, we take some corn meal, some flour, some Cajun seasoning (Zatarin’s if we have it, cayenne pepper and cumin, if we don’t), and salt and pepper to taste. Lately we’ve been combining okra and yellow squash in the same pan. Take equal amounts of okra and squash cut in 1/2″ lengths (either cut the squash in rounds, if it’s small or quarter round, if it’s bigger — huge squash probably shouldn’t be used, look for medium to small squash for this recipe). Dust in the flour/corn meal/spice mixture and let sit. Sauté onion and garlic in some olive oil (or if you want to be really traditional, use corn oil or canola oil). Fry, stirring occasionally. Yes some of the coating falls off (or most of it does), but it keeps the okra dry and adds seasoning to the mixture. Serve with field peas and a tomato for a fine Southern-style vegetarian meal. Don’t forget salsa or a nice chou-chou (a sweet, spicy relish) to on your peas. Potatoes or corn on the cob go well with this meal, too. Especially if your appetite is big…

Of course, we know and enjoy the traditional way to fry okra, though usually we opt for something a little less greasy. When we have fried it recently, we take some corn meal, some flour, some Cajun seasoning (Zatarin’s if we have it, cayenne pepper and cumin, if we don’t), and salt and pepper to taste. Lately we’ve been combining okra and yellow squash in the same pan. Take equal amounts of okra and squash cut in 1/2″ lengths (either cut the squash in rounds, if it’s small or quarter round, if it’s bigger — huge squash probably shouldn’t be used, look for medium to small squash for this recipe). Dust in the flour/corn meal/spice mixture and let sit. Sauté onion and garlic in some olive oil (or if you want to be really traditional, use corn oil or canola oil). Fry, stirring occasionally. Yes some of the coating falls off (or most of it does), but it keeps the okra dry and adds seasoning to the mixture. Serve with field peas and a tomato for a fine Southern-style vegetarian meal. Don’t forget salsa or a nice chou-chou (a sweet, spicy relish) to on your peas. Potatoes or corn on the cob go well with this meal, too. Especially if your appetite is big…

But you can’t cook like this every night. So we mix it up with some bhindi, Indian-style okra. Essentially it’s a lot like Southern fried okra without the breading and with a little different spices. We usually use lots of garlic, cumin, maybe some cardamom or curry, and quite a bit of red pepper. There are good recipes online, if you want something more specific than this. Serve with lentils and rice, or eggplant and rice, or another Indian-style vegetable.

One way to vary the experience of okra is to change the way you cut it. In typical Southern okra, they are sliced in 1/4 to 1/2″ slices. For bhindi,we like to pick out the smaller okra pods or choose a small, thin variety and just cut off the caps (if they’re tender, you might even leave some of the cap on), then fry the okra whole. Sometimes with larger okra pods, I’ve cut them in quarters or halves lengthwise for a change of pace. This affects the texture and the taste (and if cut lengthwise, more of the seeds fall out, especially with the larger varieties).

When we want to go back to Southern cooking, we often stew okra with onion, garlic, and tomatoes (fresh are best, but canned crushed or diced tomatoes will do in a pinch). And of course, we sometimes cook up some vegetarian gumbo or jambalaya.

But my favorite way to cook okra (at least before I married into a Souther family) is in a stir-fry. There the okra doesn’t overwhelm, but adds texture and flavor. There are many ways to do it, spiced with curry or (as last night) with lemon grass and chiles to make a Thai influenced dish. I ground fresh lemon grass, lime peel, cayenne pepper, and garlic in a stone mortar to make the main spices, added a little curry powder, then stir-fried with eggplant, mushroom, carrot, onion, and green pepper.

The Fusion recipe that led to the title of this post, though, was a combination of all of the above — well almost. It was a stir-fry served over soba noodles (though any asian noodle would do). The recipe was born out ofone of those “what can make with what we have left in the fridge” moments. We had made field peas earlier in week, and I had saved the left-over broth, since I’d used vegetable bouillon when I made them and didn’t want to throw it out. The stir-fry itself included okra, eggplant, yellow squash (small ones that I quartered and then cut into okra-sized lengths — I often like to match shapes in a stir-fry), and purple beans (that turn green when you cook them). I began by frying some onion, garlic, curry powder, and okra in the wok. Since we had no tofu, which I usually use in a vegetarian stir-fry, I added an egg and let it fry, coating the okra a little. Then I added the other vegetables, saving the beans for last so they would remain fresh.

Next came the field pea broth, which was pretty much a gel when I added it. It always stiffens up in the refrigerator, but usually gets more liquid when heated, so I figured this would make a slightly thick sauce. To this I added a little soy sauce and a tablespoon of tahini to help thicken it up and add flavor (you could use peanut butter, if you don’t have tahini on hand). To this I added a few quartered grape-sized (or slightly larger) tomatoes from our garden and let them cook just long enough to warm through but keep their shape.

Served over noodles, this recipe went over very well. Though it was done on the spur of the moment, I might have to try to repeat it sometime. Often I ask Kim and Aidan if they can guess the secret ingredient. This time, I didn’t bother. On the one hand, I thought they might guess tahini, but I didn’t think they’d ever guess field pea broth, the ingredient that really makes it a fusion dish in my mind. I also didn’t know if they would both appreciate it as much if they knew what it was. I guess I’ll find out, if they read the blog, anyway…

Soup and Salad (in one bowl) Recipe

One of our favorite winter meals is homemade soup. It’s so easy that it’s hard to imagine buying soup in a can. This recipe is a variation on one soup we love, a white bean and pasta soup. Virtually any combination of vegetables will do. Broth isn’t really necessary with a bean soup, just salt the water to taste (it takes more than you might think, but the sodium content will still be much lower than with processed soups). And this is vegetarian.

One bag of white beans
1/2 lb elbow macaroni or other shaped pasta
1 leek
1 large parsnip
2 carrots
black olives
crushed tomato (about 10-12 oz)
portabella mushroom
grated parmesan cheese
baby salad greens, spinach, or lettuce

Soak a bag of white beans in water over night (or in this case, I started the soak in the morning and cooked it all up in the afternoon). 6-8 hours later, drain beans and then cover with plenty of water again. Bring to a boil, then simmer for an hour or hour and a half. After half an hour or so, clean and slice the leek. (To clean, cut lengthwise down the middle and then rinse out the dirt. To slice, cut crosswise in relatively thin slices. I use all the leek unless the tops are too dry.) Sautée in a little olive oil as you cut the parsnip and carrots into relatively small pieces. Add to sautéing leek. Once the vegetables are hot and starting too cook, add to the simmering beans. Cut mushroom and add to soup with black olives and tomato. Add water as needed and continue to simmer. When about 20 minutes remain, add 8 oz. dry elbow macaroni and let cook with the soup.

Rinse your greens and spin dry. Any hardy lettuce would do, though I had some organic baby spring salad mix on hand, so I used that. If the lettuce is big, you may want to tear it into smaller pieces. Otherwise, place a handful of lettuce in each bowl and then cover with hot soup. Ours was pretty thick, since the macaroni had soaked up much of the broth and the beans helped thicken it. Top with grated parmesan cheese and more lettuce if desired. The soup cooks the lettuce slightly, but some remains crisp. Of course, the soup is fine without the salad, but if you have some lettuce or salad mix you want to use, it’s a good combination.

Mushroom Stroganoff recipe

Here’s a quick recipe for mushroom stroganoff (plus the variation I made tonight).
The basic recipe is easy with simple ingredients:
Mushrooms
Onion
Garlic
Olive Oil and butter
Buttermilk (and/or milk, sour cream, cream, etc.)
Flour
Salt
Sesame seeds (optional)
Egg noodles (or other pasta)

I think that’s all I used the last time I made this.
Boil salted water for the pasta. Cook pasta according to directions on box.
Meanwhile, sauté onion and garlic in olive oil and butter. Add sliced mushrooms and brown. Add a teaspoon or two of flour once the mushrooms are cooked. Stir until flour is mixed in the oil, then add a little pasta water to make a thick sauce. Add buttermilk (or other milk/cream). I like a stroganoff with a slightly sour taste, so buttermilk works great, though sour cream or yoghurt works well if you don’t have buttermilk. Watch that the buttermilk or yoghurt doesn’t separate. Keep the heat low when you make white sauce, and it helps to have started the sauce with pasta water so that it thickens up right away. Add sesame seeds (optional) and salt and pepper to taste. (Actually, I usually start with a little salt in the oil when I sauté, so I don’t add much later, if any.)

Variation:
Tonight, we had lots of greens, so I did the basic recipe above, then added cut kale, kohlrabi leaves, and swiss chard. To cut, I washed the greens, shook dry, then rolled and sliced them thin in one direction and then again in the other direction. I added these and simmered a bit before adding the flour. Then I added pasta water, a little crushed tomato (maybe 1/3 cup), crushed red pepper, and then buttermilk. I mixed the egg noodles in with the sauce and let simmer just a bit at the end, then served with a little parmesan cheese.

Garlic Mashed Potato Recipe

Tonight we had leftovers from Chistmas, but since the garlic mashed potatoes were so popular, we needed to make more, so I duplicated the recipe I created the other day. Undoubtedly this has been done before by others, but here’s how I decided to make them.

Ingredients:
Yukon Gold Potatoes (or other potatoes for mashing)
Water
Garlic
Salt
Butter
Buttermilk

Peel and cut up potatoes. (Peeling is optional.) Put in pan and fill pan to half the level of the potatoes (or less). (Typically, you add more water than this when boiling potatoes, but I don’t see why you should waste water and the good liquid, especially since it would lose some of the garlic flavor.) Add whole cloves of garlic (peeled). I used 3 for enough potatoes for 9 people, but you can judge based on how strong you like the flavor. This wasn’t too noticeable — I might try it with more another time. Add salt.

Boil potatoes, garlic, and salted water 20 minutes or more until the potatoes are soft enough for mashing and most of the liquid has boiled away. Remove from heat.

Add butter and buttermilk to make mashed potatoes. (You can use milk or cream to replace buttermilk, but buttermilk will give a creamy texture and slightly tangy taste, while still remaining low in fat, especially if you use low fat buttermilk instead of whole milk buttermilk.) Of course, the butter is optional…

Mash with a potato masher. As needed, add more buttermilk and salt to taste and to get the texture and flavor you want. If necessary keep the mashed potatoes on a very low burner to keep warm or to thicken up the mashed potatoes. Your garlic will mash in with the potatoes and not be noticeable other than the flavor.

On Christmas, I actually used milk and buttermilk when mashing the potatoes, but tonight I decided to go with just buttermilk, since I had plenty that I wanted to use. I liked it better tonight, though both were good and everyone liked them.